Conquest: Cortes, Montezuma, and the Fall of Old Mexico

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Simon & Schuster #ad - Drawing on newly discovered sources and writing with brilliance, and profound historical insight, drama, Hugh Thomas presents an engrossing narrative of one of the most significant events of Western history. Ringing with the fury of two great empires locked in an epic battle, Conquest captures in extraordinary detail the Mexican and Spanish civilizations and offers unprecedented in-depth portraits of the legendary opponents, Montezuma and Cortés.

Conquest is an essential work of history from one of our most gifted historians. Simon Schuster.

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The Conquest of New Spain Penguin Classics

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Penguin Books #ad - Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. Bernal díaz del castillo, the expulsion and flight of the spaniards, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their amazement at the city, the exploitation of the natives for gold and other treasures, their regrouping and eventual capture of the Aztec capital.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Vivid, powerful and absorbing, this is a first-person account of one of the most startling military episodes in history: the overthrow of Montezuma's doomed Aztec Empire by the ruthless Hernan Cortes and his band of adventurers.

The Conquest of New Spain Penguin Classics #ad - With more than 1, 700 titles, penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

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Conquistador: Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs

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Bantam #ad - It was a moment unique in human history, the face-to-face meeting between two men from civilizations a world apart. That he saw nothing paradoxical in carrying out his intentions by virtually annihilating a proud and accomplished native people is one of the most remarkable and tragic aspects of this unforgettable story.

In tenochtitlán cortés met his aztec counterpart, Montezuma: king, divinity, commander of the most powerful military machine in the Americas and ruler of a city whose splendor equaled anything in Europe. In 1519, hernán cortés arrived on the shores of Mexico, determined not only to expand the Spanish empire but to convert the natives to Catholicism and carry off a fortune in gold.

Conquistador: Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs #ad - The story of a lost kingdom, and a doomed warrior, a relentless conqueror, Conquistador is history at its most riveting. Yet in less than two years, Cortés defeated the entire Aztec nation in one of the most astounding battles ever waged. In this astonishing work of scholarship that reads like an edge-of-your-seat adventure thriller, acclaimed historian Buddy Levy records the last days of the Aztec empire and the two men at the center of an epic clash of cultures perhaps unequaled to this day.

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The Last Days of the Incas

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Simon & Schuster #ad - Used book in Good Condition. The following year, the spaniards seized the Inca capital of Cuzco, completing their conquest of the largest native empire the New World has ever known. Peru was now a spanish colony, and the conquistadors were wealthy beyond their wildest dreams. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, their steel armor and swords, the Spaniards prevailed—due largely to their horses, and their tactic of surprise.

There, he established a hidden capital, called Vilcabamba—only recently rediscovered by a trio of colorful American explorers. They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Eventually, however, pizarro and his men forced the emperor to abandon the Andes and flee to the Amazon. The epic story of the fall of the inca empire to spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, Vilcabamba, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, by three American explorers.

The Last Days of the Incas #ad - In 1532, including his four brothers, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar. A young inca emperor, soon led a massive rebellion against the Spaniards, the brother of Atahualpa, inflicting heavy casualties and nearly wiping out the conquerors.

But the Incas did not submit willingly.

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The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico

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Beacon Press #ad - For hundreds of years, the history of the conquest of Mexico and the defeat of the Aztecs has been told in the words of the Spanish victors. Miguel león-portilla has long been at the forefront of expanding that history to include the voices of indigenous peoples. Used book in Good Condition. Beacon Press MA.

In this new and updated edition of his classic The Broken Spears, León-Portilla has included accounts from native Aztec descendants across the centuries. These texts bear witness to the extraordinary vitality of an oral tradition that preserves the viewpoints of the vanquished instead of the victors. León-portilla's new Postscript reflects upon the critical importance of these unexpected historical accounts.

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1870 - The SLAVE TRADE: THE STORY OF THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE: 1440

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Simon & Schuster #ad - Beacon Press MA. Used book in Good Condition. Thomas also movingly describes such accounts as are available from the slaves themselves. Between 1492 and 1870, in mines, approximately eleven million black slaves were carried from Africa to the Americas to work on plantations, or as servants in houses. Hugh thomas's achievement is not only to present a compelling history of the time but to answer as well such controversial questions as who the traders were, the extent of the profits, and why so many African rulers and peoples willingly collaborated.

Used book in Good Condition. After many years of research, award-winning historian Hugh Thomas portrays, in a balanced account, the complete history of the slave trade. Beginning with the first portuguese slaving expeditions, he describes and analyzes the rise of one of the largest and most elaborate maritime and commercial ventures in all of history.

1870 - The SLAVE TRADE: THE STORY OF THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE: 1440 #ad - The slave trade is alive with villains and heroes and illuminated by eyewitness accounts.

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Conquistador Voices: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas as Recounted Largely by the Participants

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Spruce Tree Press #ad - To see who’s covered in each volume, click on the volume’s cover image and then Look Inside. Used book in Good Condition. If you like what you see, order a copy for yourself or other history buff today. The spanish conquest: what really happened?If you’re a person who likes to learn the messy details of events likely sanitized in your schoolbooks, Conquistador Voices may be for you.

You're likely to find this book not only informative but easy to read, because Conquistador Voices is built around first-person narratives—the kind of thing that usually holds our attention. Beacon Press MA. Used book in Good Condition. Think of it as a film documentary in written form, one that tells an important story in 500-year-old “sound bites” and narrative, and that does so in a way that informs without moralizing.

Conquistador Voices: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas as Recounted Largely by the Participants #ad - In this two-volume set you'll find neither a defense of the conquistadors nor a politically correct polemic against them. What you will find is a one-stop, five-part layman's summary of the Conquest, one that delves dispassionately into persons and events we still talk about today.

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A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies

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Penguin Classics #ad - Penguin Classics. An early traveller to the americas who sailed on one of Columbus's voyages, Las Casas was so horrified by the wholesale massacre he witnessed that he dedicated his life to protecting the Indian community. Beacon Press MA. He wrote a short account of the destruction of the Indies in 1542, a shocking catalogue of mass slaughter, torture and slavery, which showed that the evangelizing vision of Columbus had descended under later conquistadors into genocide.

Bartolomé de las casas was the first and fiercest critic of Spanish colonialism in the New World. Used book in Good Condition. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies #ad - Used book in Good Condition. With more than 1, 700 titles, penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Dedicated to philip ii to alert the castilian crown to these atrocities and demand that the Indians be entitled to the basic rights of humankind, this passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish 'Black Legend' that would last for centuries.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

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World Without End: Spain, Philip II, and the First Global Empire

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Random House #ad - Used book in Good Condition. As in his earlier books, Thomas demonstrates here that he has this in abundance. Financial times   “a vivid climax to Hugh Thomas’s three-volume history of imperial Spain. The telegraph   “thomas clearly excels in the Spanish history of religion, and culture, politics, and successfully shows that Spain’s global ambition knew no bounds.

Publishers Weekly Used book in Good Condition. But the dramatic human story of the extraordinary projection of Spanish might in the second half of the sixteenth century has never been fully told—until now. Alongside philip we find the entitled descendants of New Spain’s original explorers—men who, like their king, came into possession of land they never conquered and wielded supremacy they never sought.

World Without End: Spain, Philip II, and the First Global Empire #ad - Finally, hugh thomas unearths the first indictments of imperial Spain’s labor rights abuses in the Americas—and the early attempts by its more enlightened rulers and planters to address them. The legacy of imperial Spain was shaped by many hands. Here too are the roman catholic religious leaders of the Americas, whose internecine struggles created possibilities that the emerging Jesuit order was well-positioned to fill.

Written in the brisk, flowing narrative style that has come to define Hugh Thomas’s work, the final volume of this acclaimed trilogy stands alone as a history of an empire making the transition from conquest to inheritance—a history that Thomas reveals through the fascinating lives of the people who made it.

Praise for world without end  “Readers will not find a more reliable guide to the maturing Spanish Empire.

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The Golden Empire: Spain, Charles V, and the Creation of America

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Random House #ad - Thomas brings to life king charles v—first as a gangly and easygoing youth, then as a liberal statesman who exceeded all his predecessors in his ambitions for conquest while making sure to maintain the humanity of his new subjects in the Americas, and finally as a besieged Catholic leader obsessed with Protestant heresy and interested only in profiting from those he presided over.

The golden empire also presents the legendary men whom king charles v sent on perilous and unprecedented expeditions: hernán cortés, atahualpa, and was finally murdered amid intrigue; and Hernando de Soto, infamously executed the last independent Inca ruler, who ruled the “New Spain” of Mexico as an absolute monarch—and whose rebuilding of its capital, who set out with fewer than two hundred men for Peru, Tenochtitlan, was Spain’s greatest achievement in the sixteenth century; Francisco Pizarro, whose glittering journey to settle land between Rio de la Palmas in Mexico and the southernmost keys of Florida ended in disappointment and death.

The Golden Empire: Spain, Charles V, and the Creation of America #ad - Third volume in the acclaimed 3-volume history of the Spanish Empire, a fine first edition with fine dust jacket. Used book in Good Condition. Used book in Good Condition. Beacon Press MA. Penguin Classics. Used book in Good Condition.

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When Montezuma Met Cortés: The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History

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Ecco #ad - Beacon Press MA. Third volume in the acclaimed 3-volume history of the Spanish Empire, a fine first edition with fine dust jacket. Drawing on rare primary sources and overlooked accounts by conquistadors and Aztecs alike, step by step, Restall explores Cortés’s and Montezuma’s posthumous reputations, and the worlds in which they lived—leading, their achievements and failures, to a dramatic inversion of the old story.

. As restall takes us through this sweeping, indeed, and, he calls into question our view of the history of the Americas, revisionist account of a pivotal moment in modern civilization, of history itself. Used book in Good Condition. Penguin Classics. This introduction—the prelude to the spanish seizure of Mexico City and to European colonization of the mainland of the Americas—has long been the symbol of Cortés’s bold and brilliant military genius.

Montezuma, on the other hand, is remembered as a coward who gave away a vast empire and touched off a wave of colonial invasions across the hemisphere. But is this really what happened? in a departure from traditional tellings, When Montezuma Met Cortés uses “the Meeting”—as Restall dubs their first encounter—as the entry point into a comprehensive reevaluation of both Cortés and Montezuma.

When Montezuma Met Cortés: The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History #ad - Used book in Good Condition. Used book in Good Condition. A dramatic rethinking of the encounter between montezuma and hernando cortés that completely overturns what we know about the Spanish conquest of the AmericasOn November 8, 1519, the Aztec emperor, the Spanish conquistador Hernando Cortés first met Montezuma, at the entrance to the capital city of Tenochtitlan.

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