Cheap Amusements

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Temple University Press #ad - By examining the rituals and styles they adopted and placing that culture in the larger context of urban working-class life, she offers us a complex picture of the dynamics shaping a working woman's experience and consciousness at the turn-of-the-century. Not only does her analysis lead us to new insights into working-class culture, changing social relations between single men and women, and urban courtship, but it also gives us a fuller understanding of the cultural transformations that gave rise to the commercialization of leisure.

The early twentieth century witnessed the emergence of "heterosocial companionship" as a dominant ideology of gender, affirming mixed-sex patterns of social interaction, in contrast to the nineteenth century's segregated spheres. What did young, independent women do for fun and how did they pay their way into New York City's turn-of-the-century pleasure places? Cheap Amusements is a fascinating discussion of young working women whose meager wages often fell short of bare subsistence and rarely allowed for entertainment expenses.

Cheap Amusements #ad - Kathy peiss follows working women into saloons, social clubs, dance halls, Coney Island amusement parks, and nickelodeons to explore the culture of these young women between 1880 and 1920 as expressed in leisure activities. Cheap amusements argues that a crucial part of the "reorientation of American culture" originated from below, specifically in the subculture of working women to be found in urban dance halls and amusement resorts.

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Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945

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Oxford University Press #ad - When a formal repatriation campaign pushed thousands to return to Mexico, those remaining in Los Angeles launched new campaigns to gain civil rights as ethnic Americans through labor unions and New Deal politics. By focusing on mexican immigrants to Los Angeles from 1900 to 1945, George J. Sánchez explores the process by which temporary sojourners altered their orientation to that of permanent residents, thereby laying the foundation for a new Mexican-American culture.

Twentieth-century los angeles has been the locus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between variant cultures in American history. Analyzing not only formal programs aimed at these newcomers by the United States and Mexico, religious practice, musical entertainment, and work and consumption patterns, but also the world created by these immigrants through family networks, Sánchez uncovers the creative ways Mexicans adapted their culture to life in the United States.

Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 #ad - The immigrant generation, therefore, laid the groundwork for the emerging Mexican-American identity of their children. Yet this study is among the first to examine the relationship between ethnicity and identity among the largest immigrant group to that city.

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The War in American Culture: Society and Consciousness during World War II

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University of Chicago Press #ad - Concentrating on the home front and the impact of the war on the lives of ordinary Americans, Latinos, sexuality, the contributors give us a rich portrayal of family life, cultural images, and working-class life in addition to detailed consideration of African Americans, and women who lived through the unsettling and rapidly altered circumstances of wartime America.

. The war in american culture explores the role of World War II in the transformation of American social, cultural, and political life. World war ii posed a crisis for american culture: to defeat the enemy, Americans had to unite across the class, racial and ethnic boundaries that had long divided them. Exploring government censorship of war photography, Hollywood moviemaking, these essays reveal the creation of a new national identity that was pluralistic, the revision of immigration laws, swing music, and popular magazines, but also controlled and sanitized.

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Updated Edition Politics and Society in Modern America Book 115 - Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right

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Princeton University Press #ad - We learn what motivated them and how they interpreted their political activity. Lisa mcgirr shows that their movement was not one of marginal people suffering from status anxiety, but rather one formed by successful entrepreneurial types with modern lifestyles and bright futures. Through this history, she traces the evolution of the New Right from a virulent anticommunist, anti-establishment fringe to a broad national movement nourished by evangelical Protestantism.

In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. The media lampooned John Birchers's accusations that Dwight Eisenhower was a communist puppet. Suburban warriors introduces us to these people: women hosting coffee klatches for Barry Goldwater in their tract houses; members of anticommunist reading groups organizing against sex education; pro-life Democrats gradually drawn into conservative circles; and new arrivals finding work in defense companies and a sense of community in Orange County's mushrooming evangelical churches.

Updated Edition Politics and Society in Modern America Book 115 - Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right #ad - Mccarthyism was on the run, and movements on the political left were grabbing headlines. While introducing these rank-and-file activists, McGirr chronicles Orange County's rise from "nut country" to political vanguard. Yet, in utt's home district of orange county, thousands of middle-class suburbanites proceeded to organize a powerful conservative movement that would land Ronald Reagan in the White House and redefine the spectrum of acceptable politics into the next century.

Utt that "barefooted africans" were training in Georgia to help the United Nations take over the country. She describes how these suburban pioneers created new political and social philosophies anchored in a fusion of Christian fundamentalism, xenophobic nationalism, and western libertarianism.

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Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America

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University of Chicago Press #ad - The arrival of television did more than turn the living room into a private theater: it offered a national stage on which to play out and resolve conflicts about the way Americans should live. Spigel chronicles this lively and contentious debate as it took place in the popular media. She chronicles the role of television as a focus for evolving debates on issues ranging from the ideal of the perfect family and changes in women's role within the household to new uses of domestic space.

Between 1948 and 1955, nearly two-thirds of all American families bought a television set—and a revolution in social life and popular culture was launched. In this fascinating book, over the course of a single decade, Lynn Spigel chronicles the enormous impact of television in the formative years of the new medium: how, television became an intimate part of everyday life.

Of particular interest is her treatment of the way in which the phenomenon of television itself was constantly deliberated—from how programs should be watched to where the set was placed to whether Mom, Dad, or kids should control the dial. Make room for tv combines a powerful analysis of the growth of electronic culture with a nuanced social history of family life in postwar America, offering a provocative glimpse of the way television became the mirror of so many of America's hopes and fears and dreams.

Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America #ad - What did americans expect from it? what effects did the new daily ritual of watching television have on children? Was television welcomed as an unprecedented "window on the world, from sitcom scripts to articles and advertisements in women's magazines, " or as a "one-eyed monster" that would disrupt households and corrupt children?Drawing on an ambitious array of unconventional sources, Spigel offers the fullest available account of the popular response to television in the postwar years.

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The Promised Land Penguin Classics

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Penguin Classics #ad - Preternaturally inquisitive, Antin was a provocative observer of the identity-altering contrasts between Old World andNew. Her narrative — of universal appeal and rich in its depictions of both worlds — captures a large-scale sociocultural landscape and paints a profound self-portrait of an iconoclast seeking to reconcile herheritage with her newfound identity as an American citizen.

Mary antin emigrated with her family from theEastern European town of Polotzk to Boston in 1894, when she was twelve years old. An extraordinary popular success when it was first published in 1912, The Promised Land is a classic account of the Jewish American immigrant experience.

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Roots Too: White Ethnic Revival in Post-Civil Rights America

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Harvard University Press #ad - Although this turn to ethnicity was for many an individual search for familial and psychological identity, Roots Too establishes a broader white social and political consensus arising in response to the political language of the Civil Rights movement. In the 1970s, white ethnics mobilized around a new version of the epic tale of plucky immigrants making their way in the New World through the sweat of their brow.

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From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America

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Oxford University Press #ad - From out of the shadows was the first full study of Mexican-American women in the twentieth century. Ruiz reveals the struggles they have faced and the communities they have built. She also narrates the tensions that arose between generations, as the parents tried to rein in young daughters eager to adopt American ways.

Beginning with the first wave of Mexican women crossing the border early in the century, historian Vicki L. Finally, the book highlights the various forms of political protest initiated by Mexican-American women, including civil rights activity and protests against the war in Vietnam. For this new edition of from out of the shadows, ruiz has written an afterword that continues the story of the Mexicana experience in the United States, as well as outlines new additions to the growing field of Latina history.

From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America #ad - . In a narrative enhanced by interviews and personal stories, built extended networks, Mexican women nurtured families, boxcar settlements, she shows how from labor camps, worked for wages, and urban barrios, and participated in community associations--efforts that helped Mexican Americans find their own place in America.

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Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America

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Oxford University Press #ad - Their experiences on angel Island reveal how America's discriminatory immigration policies changed the lives of immigrants and transformed the nation. A place of heartrending history and breathtaking beauty, the Angel Island Immigration Station is a National Historic Landmark, and like Ellis Island, it is recognized as one of the most important sites where America's immigration history was made.

This fascinating history is ultimately about America itself and its complicated relationship to immigration, a story that continues today. For many, this was the real gateway to the United States. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station.

Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America #ad - From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. Drawing on extensive new research, " japanese picture brides, south asian political activists, Filipino repatriates, Mexican families, Russian and Jewish refugees, and inscriptions on the barrack walls, Korean students, oral histories, including immigration records, the authors produce a sweeping yet intensely personal history of Chinese "paper sons, and many others from around the world.

For others, it was a prison and their final destination, before being sent home. In this landmark book, historians erika Lee and Judy Yung both descendants of immigrants detained on the island provide the first comprehensive history of the Angel Island Immigration Station.

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How It Feels to Be Free: Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights Movement

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Oxford University Press #ad - By putting black women performances at center stage, Feldstein sheds light on the meanings of black womanhood in a revolutionary time. In 1968, hollywood cast the outspoken Lincoln as a maid to a white family in For Love of Ivy, adding a layer of complication to the film. Winner of the Benjamin L. Was julia a landmark for casting a black woman or for treating her race as unimportant? The answer is not clear-cut.

Makeba connected america's struggle for civil rights to the fight against apartheid in South Africa, while Simone sparked high-profile controversy with her incendiary lyrics. Yet audiences gave broader meaning to what sometimes seemed to be apolitical performances. How it feels to be free demonstrates that entertainment was not always just entertainment and that "We Shall Overcome" was not the only soundtrack to the civil rights movement.

How It Feels to Be Free: Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights Movement #ad - But her confrontational style was not the only path taken by black women entertainers. In how it feels to be free, ruth feldstein examines celebrated black women performers, their roles at home and abroad, illuminating the risks they took, and the ways that they raised the issue of gender amid their demands for black liberation.

That same year, diahann Carroll took on the starring role in the television series Julia. These women did not simply mirror black activism; their performances helped constitute the era's political history. Hooks national book awardwinnter of the michael nelson prize of the International Association for Media and HistoryIn 1964, Nina Simone sat at a piano in New York's Carnegie Hall to play what she called a "show tune.

Then she began to sing: "alabama's got me so upset/Tennessee made me lose my rest/And everybody knows about Mississippi Goddam!" Simone, and her song, became icons of the civil rights movement.

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American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People

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Hill and Wang #ad - Breen's strikingly original book explains how ordinary Americans—most of them members of farm families living in small communities—were drawn into a successful insurgency against imperial authority. A few celebrated figures in the Continental Congress do not make for a revolution. American insurgents, American Patriots reminds us that revolutions are violent events.

They provoke passion and rage, a deep sense of betrayal, a willingness to use violence to achieve political ends, and a strong religious conviction that God expects an oppressed people to defend their rights. This is the compelling story of our national political origins that most Americans do not know.

American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People #ad - It requires tens of thousands of ordinary men and women willing to sacrifice, kill, and be killed. It is a story of rumor, vengeance, charity, and restraint. H. Challenging and displacing decades of received wisdom, T. They channeled popular rage through elected committees of safety and observation, which before 1776 were the heart of American resistance.

Breen not only gives the history of these ordinary Americans but, drawing upon a wealth of rarely seen documents, restores their primacy to American independence. Mobilizing two years before the Declaration of Independence, American insurgents in all thirteen colonies concluded that resistance to British oppression required organized violence against the state.

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